April 1997 Edition

  • New way of 'kerbing' costs

    The City of Canning in Western Australia has developed a kerb overlay method for upgrading precast concrete kerbing which is cracked, out of alignment or of varying height. Compared to full replacement, this results in a 70 percent cost saving.
  • Noarlunga cleans up

    Dog faeces left on selected beaches and reserves in South Australia's City of Noarlunga have been cut by 90 percent during a trial of special dog litter bins. Analysis of the 90 percent reduction revealed supplying plastic bags was crucial to the success of the trial.
  • Stormwater as community resource

    Post war development in Australia saw large scale urbanisation. Land being cleared for housing and industry necessitated widespread concrete drainage and sewerage systems. Infrastructure for a rapidly growing population came at a cost to the landscape and environment. As far back as 1984, the City of Salisbury in South Australia set about addressing both this problem and the need to develop a less polluting method of stormwater management and flood control.
  • Planning for major events

    The Australian Institute for Traffic Planning and Management (AITPM) will hold its 1997 National Conference at the Hotel Sofitel in Melbourne on 5 and 6 June. Titled 'Major Events - Traffic & Transport Planning', the Conference is expected to attract delegates from across Australia. It will examine the countless demands placed on organising committees in staging such events.

  • Editorial

    In a recent address, John Kleem, project consultant for a national benchmarking project, said that benchmarking will always mean different things to different people. He is concerned that, to date, no attempt has been made to account for democratic choice. John Kleem believes it is essential that some sort of weighting addressing this issue is built into all forms of best practice through benchmarking.
  • Competing Councils

    Following extensive consultation, the Western Australian Municipal Association (WAMA), has developed a strategy for implementing the National Competition Policy in Councils across the State. The Guidelines provide background and an overview of NCP as it applies to WA and practical methodologies and tools for the implementation of its principles by Councils.
  • Revamped structure for Mitcham

    Mitcham Council is reforming its Committee structure as part of the implementation of this South Australian City's Strategic Plan. The need to further streamline decision processing by Council Committees and maintain community participation in decisions affecting the City is paramount to this restructure.
  • Picturesque visitor's centre

    Visitors to Northam, 100 kilometres north east of Perth, will soon have a new Information and Activity Centre to greet them. Construction of the new Regional Visitor and Heritage Centre on the banks of the Avon River is well under way and expected to be completed by July.
  • Incentive agreement for constructtion project

    Toowoomba City Council workers certainly have an incentive to complete Stage two of a major inner city redevelopment project ahead of schedule. All construction staff involved in the project and Council have agreed to an Incentive Bonus Scheme if the project is completed ahead of schedule.
  • Rockdale wins Prime Minister's Award

    Rockdale City Council has been awarded the prestigious Prime Minister's Award for the development of its Action Plan in accordance with the Disability Discrimination Act. The awards recognise the achievements of public sector organisations in responding to new demands and changing the way they do business.
  • Democracy returns to Victoria

    Elections in Victoria in March saw the return of elected Councillors to 77 of this State's 78 Councils. Residents in the 54 Municipalities, electing their first Council on 15 March following Local Government restructure, have been without elected representation since December 1994. However, recent statements made by Rob McLellan, Minister for Local Government, have cast doubts as to whether democracy has in fact returned to Victorian Local Government.
  • Native title: implications for planners and valuers

    Planners and valuers in Australia have most often dealt with title to land under post colonial legislation, mainly freehold and leasehold title, whether in Aboriginal or non Aboriginal ownership. The concept of native title under common law in Australia was first recognised in the High Court decision in the case of Mabo vs. the State of Queensland. The judgement overturned the principle of terra nullius (a land belonging to no one).
  • Strategies for excellence

    Using the theme 'Strategies for Excellence', the South Australian Institute of Municipal Management's Annual Conference was held recently in Adelaide. In a climate of major change, including Council amalgamations and a review of the Local Government Act, the Conference program was well received by delegates.
  • WA and SA to polls

    On Saturday 3 May, voters in Western Australia will elect candidates to fill 873 vacancies across the State's 142 Councils. New provisions under the Local Government Act now enable Councils to conduct their polls by postal voting. Elections are also scheduled for 60 of South Australia's Councils during May. Forty five of these Councils will be using postal voting. Similar to WA, voting is also not compulsory for Council elections in this State

  • Wollondilly leads waste race

    The NSW Government's target of 60 percent reduction in waste going to landfill by 2000 appears well within the reach of some Councils in the Sydney area. This is particularly so for Wollondilly, overall winner in the 1996 Council Incentive Program.
  • First Council sworn in

    At Council's first statutory meeting on Tuesday 18 March, Cr Sam De Gabrielle was elected Mayor. He is joined on Council by Councillors Faye Ure, Audrey Whittingham, George Rochfort, Bill Lodwick, Don Paterson and David McCullough. Strong interest was shown in the election with 20 candidates nominating for the seven positions.
  • The heart of Victoria

    Mitchell Shire extends from Melbourne's northern fringe to the farming country of north central Victoria. It is an expansive Shire that sits in Victoria's geographic heart. A mix of rural holdings blend with Mitchell's townships to create a diverse region. It is also a Shire with a sense of direction and purpose in its planning for the future.
  • Council buildings maintain community focus

    Council's administrative headquarters at Broadford are at the geographic centre of the Shire providing a central location from which Council delivers its services. To complete the communication network, Council has also set up information resource centres throughout the Shire. This combination gives residents easy access to a wide range of Council information.
  • New structure improves service delivery

    With the introduction of Compulsory Competitive Tendering, Mitchell Shire Council resolved to establish a new organisational structure, placing it on a firm business footing both in its delivery and purchasing of services.
  • Enterprise and alternative farming

    Farming and manufacturing activities are evident throughout Mitchell Shire, providing a wealth of opportunities for people who live and work in the district. While Mitchell Shire is the home of a number of major industries, it is in the area of small business that Council sees the greatest potential for employment growth. The Shire believes it is important to assist small business wherever possible to ensure a healthy local economy.
  • Meeting the needs of families

    With 326 full time placements and 100 carers providing the service, Mitchell Family Day Care is a large and popular part of Council's Human Services Business. According to Razija Nu'man, Group Manager of Human Services, Family Day Care is clearly the preferred form of childcare in the Shire. In what is a close knit community, many of the care providers are already known to the children they look after.
  • Consultation the key to new planning scheme

    A challenge for Mitchell Shire Council has been the development of a single Mitchell planning scheme to replace the planning schemes of the preamalgamation municipalities. Council's new planning scheme will provide uniform planning controls across the Shire and will conform with State legislative requirements.
  • Honbetsu - Mitchell's sister city

    Honbetsu town on Hokkaido in the north of Japan is Mitchell Shire's sister city. This affiliation has seen the development of mutual interest in culture, education and tourism. Exchange of local produce has also proven to be popular with the two communities.
  • Engineering excellence recognised

    Once again the NSW Division of the IMEA has acknowledged the contribution of engineers to innovative problem solving initiatives in Local Government through its annual Engineering Excellence Awards. The Awards are made in three categories.
  • Innovative planning for Kingborough

    Tasmania's Kingborough Council is undertaking an innovative project that will result in professional design and economic development plans for four of its local towns. In May, Council will host a team of 20 professionals from the United States. They will bring their diverse range of skills to a unique and intensive design exercise called 'Charrettes'.

  • Winning partnerships the key

    IMEA has formed a joint venture with State Wide Roads to produce software covering a range of specifications and contract documentation for use by Councils throughout Australia. The AUS-SPEC series helps ensure technical and contractual consistency between Councils, yet provides for flexibility where necessary.
  • Communicate or crumble

    "The thing Local Government engineers have not done as well as they might over the past decade is to communicate the asset management message to politicians," said Dean Taylor, Asset Management Coordinator Wanganui District Council in New Zealand. "If we fail to communicate, it is the assets we control on behalf of our communities that will crumble."
  • Editorial

    In a recent address, John Kleem, project consultant for a national benchmarking project, said that benchmarking will always mean different things to different people. He is concerned that, to date, no attempt has been made to account for democratic choice. John Kleem believes it is essential that some sort of weighting addressing this issue is built into all forms of best practice through benchmarking.
  • Rockdale wins Prime Minister's Award

    Rockdale City Council has been awarded the prestigious Prime Minister's Award for the development of its Action Plan in accordance with the Disability Discrimination Act. The awards recognise the achievements of public sector organisations in responding to new demands and changing the way they do business.
  • Satisfaction guaranteed at Manningham

    Long before the Victorian State Government announced plans requiring Councils to develop service charters for residents, Manningham City Council identified this as a priority including it in its 1995-1998 Corporate Plan. The decision culminated with the recent launch of the City's Customer Service Package, the principle component being a Customer Service Undertaking.
  • Showcasing Melbourne

    A new concept in tourism services was launched in February by the Lord Mayor of Melbourne, Cr Ivan Deveson. The 'City Experience Centre' and 'Melbourne Greeter Service' showcase Melbourne's culture and enhance the City's profile as the gateway to Victoria. It is the first truly multilingual, multimedia visitor orientation and information centre in Australia.
  • Democracy returns to Victoria

    Elections in Victoria in March saw the return of elected Councillors to 77 of this State's 78 Councils. Residents in the 54 Municipalities, electing their first Council on 15 March following Local Government restructure, have been without elected representation since December 1994. However, recent statements made by Rob McLellan, Minister for Local Government, have cast doubts as to whether democracy has in fact returned to Victorian Local Government.
  • Native title: implications for planners and valuers

    Planners and valuers in Australia have most often dealt with title to land under post colonial legislation, mainly freehold and leasehold title, whether in Aboriginal or non Aboriginal ownership. The concept of native title under common law in Australia was first recognised in the High Court decision in the case of Mabo vs. the State of Queensland. The judgement overturned the principle of terra nullius (a land belonging to no one).