October 1997 Edition

  • Cyclone readiness

    The largest urban settlement in the Pilbara and in one of the most isolated areas on earth, the Town of Port Hedland is very aware of the high risk of loss of life and property damage from cyclones. Recent changes to the Western Australian Local Government Act now enables Councils to issue clean up notices to residents and businesses, forcing them to remove material and other potential missiles from their properties. Port Hedland is one of the first Councils in the State to put in place these provisions under Schedule 3.1 of the Act.
  • Commendation for Disability Services Plan

    Ashburton Shire Council has been commended by the State Government for its service to people with disabilities. Under the State Disability Services Act (1993), all Councils are required to develop and implement Disability Service Plans ensuring that services and facilities are accessible to people with disabilities.
  • Celebrating our past

    Roebourne Shire has developed a Management Plan for the historic town of Cossack. Enhancements included in this plan will make it a major tourist attraction. One of the oldest areas in the region, Cossack was the port for early European settlement in the Pilbara.
  • Redland engineers deliver

    Engineers at Redland Shire Council in Queensland have cause to congratulate themselves with two recent significant achievements. Not only did Phil Hennessey, Director of Engineering Services, become the first Queenslander to win the Keith Wood Medal but Redland became the first Council in Australia to obtain Quality Accreditation for all facets of its Engineering services.
  • Fast tracking flood repairs

    In a demonstration of the success of the Memorandum of Understanding, that now operates between the Department of Housing and Local Government and Councils in the Northern Territory, funding to repair damage in the wake of Cyclone Rachel and an extreme wet season was approved within three months of the first meeting of relevant authorities.
  • Pocket wetlands produce results

    The use of pocket wetlands to reduce pollutants from urban run off was the topic of the 'Best Paper' presented at the recent 9th National Local Government Engineers Conference. Geoff Hunter from Blacktown City Council in NSW was awarded the E J Hooper Medal for his presentation on the principles behind the wetlands approach.
  • Putting the customer first

    Throughout the public sector, an increased emphasis is being placed on customer service and marketing. To ensure these vital elements are included in business plans, Brisbane City Council has produced a document titled, 'Customer Service and Marketing Cycle'.
  • Combining the best of the old and new

    Recently amalgamated City of Charles Sturt in South Australia is meeting the increasing demands on Local Government with the construction of a new, award winning, Civic Centre.
  • Cutting edge market research

    Gosnells City Council is committed to being at the leading edge of Local Government in Australia. Council has recently completed a Customer Service Survey with the assistance of the respected Marketing Centre of Perth. Gosnells believes it is the first Council worldwide to employ this particular research technique.
  • Value for money at Fremantle

    Changes to the Local Government Act, and the impending introduction of National Competition Policy, has led Fremantle City Council to develop a single process to meet all these requirements. Working well ahead of statutory requirements, in November 1996, Fremantle's 'Value for Money' document was produced.
  • Social planning in the real world

    The City of Port Adelaide Enfield consists of a range of post war and earlier settlement, falling into the 'middle ring' suburbs of Adelaide. Within this 'stable' urban environment, major residential developments were initiated by the State Government during the 90s. All have involved private sector developers in joint venture arrangements.
  • Better longer lasting infrastructure

    "We have Friends of the Library but we do not have Friends of the Sewer." Quoting Robert Goodwin, Director of Public Works in Rockville, Maryland, Dirk van Rhyn from Redcliffe City Council in Queensland summed up the dilemma that faces major infrastructure funding.
  • CDS litter traps attract world attention

    A growing number of Australian Councils deserve a pat on the back for thinking globally and acting locally. Their foresight has ensured they are at the winning edge of world stormwater technology. The Councils have installed CDS litter traps, a unique solution to remove oil, sediment and litter from stormwater systems, preventing the pollutants from fouling our beaches and waterways.
  • Resources boom gives Pilbara world focus

    Covering 510,000 square kilometres, the Pilbara comprises four Local Government authorities, the Town of Port Hedland and the Shires of Ashburton, East Pilbara and Roebourne. It is one of Western Australia's largest regions. East Pilbara Shire is not only the State's largest Local Government area but holds this record worldwide.
  • Diversification and development

    With the region in the grip of a multi-million dollar investment boom, and its full potential unlikely to be realised for a number of decades, it is vital to plan carefully for the future. Boasting some of the world's largest deposits of iron ore and other mineral riches including base metals, gold and salt; world class reserves of off shore oil and gas; and its close proximity to the fast growing export markets in Asia makes the Pilbara quite unique.
  • Regional cooperation

    The Pilbara Ward Councils meet on a regular basis to discuss matters of common interest across the region. They work closely with other key regional bodies including the Pilbara Development Commission and the Pilbara Tourism Association.
  • Blending the old and the new

    Roebourne is the oldest town in the north west of the State. In 1969, the Town of Karratha was established. Now the service centre for Roebourne Shire, it has a population of just over 10,000 residents. Roebourne and Karratha provide an interesting mix of the old and the new. Roebourne has many charming heritage buildings from last century, while Karratha is an excellent example of a carefully planned, modern, vibrant township.
  • Reef to range in Ashburton

    Spanning an area half the size of Victoria, the Shire of Ashburton, located in the north west of Western Australia offers something for everyone. For people across Australia, this 105,647 square kilometre Shire generates enormous wealth. Some of the world's largest open cut mines and the largest exporters of natural resources can be found in Tom Price, Pannawonica and Paraburdoo.
  • Northern exposure to strategic planning

    The Shire of East Pilbara is developing a comprehensive Strategic Plan to identify service priorities and direction for the next five years. To ensure the Plan reflects community aspirations, extensive consultations with residents, community groups, schools, government, mining companies and the commercial sector have been undertaken.
  • Port Hedland manages rapid growth

    The home of BHP interests in the Pilbara, Port Hedland is currently experiencing rapid growth. When BHP announced that it would construct a Hot Briquette Iron Plant as well as a capacity expansion project for its current operations, these two projects, valued at $2 billion, created 2,000 new jobs.
  • The world's largest Council

    In area, East Pilbara is the world's largest Local Government authority. Stretching from the Indian Ocean to the Northern Territory border, the Shire's 10,200 residents are largely found in the four towns of Newman, Marble Bar, Nullagine and Telfer.
  • Ecotourism adventure 2 billion years in the making

    The world's latest ecotourism adventure, the Pilbara's 2.5 billion year old landscape not only abounds in mineral wealth but its breath taking gorges, beautiful coastline with over 200 virgin islands, hidden valleys, captivating national parks and prolific Aboriginal engravings offer a wilderness experience not to be missed. Just as important as ecotourism is the growth of industrial tourism. Annually, some 40,000 visitors to the region board buses at Tom Price or Newman to see the huge open cuts where iron ore is extracted and then loaded onto trains often over 2 kilometres in length.

  • Editorial

    Elected representatives for all spheres of government understand the importance of long term planning for the ongoing prosperity and wellbeing of the community they serve. At the same time, they are just as aware that in just a few short years their constituents will want to see tangible runs on the board. This balancing of long term planning with short term results is a major issue facing all governments.
  • People oriented City of vitality

    Over the next 12 months, Perth is proud to be hosting no less than 12 international events. Lord Mayor Peter Nattrass describes Perth as a people oriented, friendly City. Since a boundary restructure in 1994, Council is much more focused on its Central Business District.
  • National Assembly takes on the big issues

    The 4th National General Assembly of Local Government once again will provide a national profile for Local Government as representatives of Councils across the country come together to debate key issues. To be staged in Canberra from 23-26 November, this year's Assembly also marks the Australian Local Government Association's 50th Anniversary.

  • Tasmania's best practice in bridge replacement

    Tasmanian Councils have joined together to come up with a solution to reduce the cost of bridge replacement. The solution was to develop a manual of standard bridge designs. This removes the need to prepare individual designs and documentation for small bridges, typical of those found on local roads.
  • Access for all - a must for best practice

    'Access for All' is an essential element of any Local Government facility or service aiming to achieve best practice status. The Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act has determined the responsibilities of Local Government, which now must address access challenges and adapt facilities and services to ensure access for all members of the community.
  • Pocket wetlands produce results

    The use of pocket wetlands to reduce pollutants from urban run off was the topic of the 'Best Paper' presented at the recent 9th National Local Government Engineers Conference. Geoff Hunter from Blacktown City Council in NSW was awarded the E J Hooper Medal for his presentation on the principles behind the wetlands approach.
  • Bendigo calling

    With the aim of winning major employment opportunities for its residents, the City of Greater Bendigo in central Victoria has established Bendigo Calling, a consortium of business and Council representatives. Currently Bendigo Calling is bidding for a new National Call Centre to be established in the City.
  • QA - making it work

    Critics of quality assurance (QA) often claim it creates too much paperwork and adds an extra level of bureaucracy to business practices. Tony Wilson, specialist quality systems consultant and Quality Manager for Douglas Partners questions those who claim that QA is fundamentally unsatisfactory. His concern is that its critics may only have experienced poorly designed QA systems.
  • Best practice in waste management

    Coffs Harbour City Council will host its second major waste management conference from 5-7 November 1997 at Novotel Opal Cove Resort, Coffs Harbour. This conference follows the successful 1996 event, which attracted 272 delegates from 85 Councils.
  • Partnering links Council and contractor

    Contracting out services may bring many benefits but one potential problem is the risk of service implementation becoming too distant from the ultimately responsible body, namely, Council. Having just awarded what is believed to be the biggest contract yet made in the State, to private firm Transfield, Mornington Peninsula Shire Council in Victoria is determined to avoid this pitfall. To do so it has entered a landmark Partnering agreement with Transfield.
  • CDS litter traps attract world attention

    A growing number of Australian Councils deserve a pat on the back for thinking globally and acting locally. Their foresight has ensured they are at the winning edge of world stormwater technology. The Councils have installed CDS litter traps, a unique solution to remove oil, sediment and litter from stormwater systems, preventing the pollutants from fouling our beaches and waterways.

  • Resources boom gives Pilbara world focus

    Covering 510,000 square kilometres, the Pilbara comprises four Local Government authorities, the Town of Port Hedland and the Shires of Ashburton, East Pilbara and Roebourne. It is one of Western Australia's largest regions. East Pilbara Shire is not only the State's largest Local Government area but holds this record worldwide.
  • Diversification and development

    With the region in the grip of a multi-million dollar investment boom, and its full potential unlikely to be realised for a number of decades, it is vital to plan carefully for the future. Boasting some of the world's largest deposits of iron ore and other mineral riches including base metals, gold and salt; world class reserves of off shore oil and gas; and its close proximity to the fast growing export markets in Asia makes the Pilbara quite unique.
  • Regional cooperation

    The Pilbara Ward Councils meet on a regular basis to discuss matters of common interest across the region. They work closely with other key regional bodies including the Pilbara Development Commission and the Pilbara Tourism Association.
  • Blending the old and the new

    Roebourne is the oldest town in the north west of the State. In 1969, the Town of Karratha was established. Now the service centre for Roebourne Shire, it has a population of just over 10,000 residents. Roebourne and Karratha provide an interesting mix of the old and the new. Roebourne has many charming heritage buildings from last century, while Karratha is an excellent example of a carefully planned, modern, vibrant township.
  • Reef to range in Ashburton

    Spanning an area half the size of Victoria, the Shire of Ashburton, located in the north west of Western Australia offers something for everyone. For people across Australia, this 105,647 square kilometre Shire generates enormous wealth. Some of the world's largest open cut mines and the largest exporters of natural resources can be found in Tom Price, Pannawonica and Paraburdoo.
  • Northern exposure to strategic planning

    The Shire of East Pilbara is developing a comprehensive Strategic Plan to identify service priorities and direction for the next five years. To ensure the Plan reflects community aspirations, extensive consultations with residents, community groups, schools, government, mining companies and the commercial sector have been undertaken.
  • Port Hedland manages rapid growth

    The home of BHP interests in the Pilbara, Port Hedland is currently experiencing rapid growth. When BHP announced that it would construct a Hot Briquette Iron Plant as well as a capacity expansion project for its current operations, these two projects, valued at $2 billion, created 2,000 new jobs.
  • The world's largest Council

    In area, East Pilbara is the world's largest Local Government authority. Stretching from the Indian Ocean to the Northern Territory border, the Shire's 10,200 residents are largely found in the four towns of Newman, Marble Bar, Nullagine and Telfer.
  • Ecotourism adventure 2 billion years in the making

    The world's latest ecotourism adventure, the Pilbara's 2.5 billion year old landscape not only abounds in mineral wealth but its breath taking gorges, beautiful coastline with over 200 virgin islands, hidden valleys, captivating national parks and prolific Aboriginal engravings offer a wilderness experience not to be missed. Just as important as ecotourism is the growth of industrial tourism. Annually, some 40,000 visitors to the region board buses at Tom Price or Newman to see the huge open cuts where iron ore is extracted and then loaded onto trains often over 2 kilometres in length.
  • Cyclone readiness

    The largest urban settlement in the Pilbara and in one of the most isolated areas on earth, the Town of Port Hedland is very aware of the high risk of loss of life and property damage from cyclones. Recent changes to the Western Australian Local Government Act now enables Councils to issue clean up notices to residents and businesses, forcing them to remove material and other potential missiles from their properties. Port Hedland is one of the first Councils in the State to put in place these provisions under Schedule 3.1 of the Act.
  • Commendation for Disability Services Plan

    Ashburton Shire Council has been commended by the State Government for its service to people with disabilities. Under the State Disability Services Act (1993), all Councils are required to develop and implement Disability Service Plans ensuring that services and facilities are accessible to people with disabilities.
  • Celebrating our past

    Roebourne Shire has developed a Management Plan for the historic town of Cossack. Enhancements included in this plan will make it a major tourist attraction. One of the oldest areas in the region, Cossack was the port for early European settlement in the Pilbara.